GGF 2035 Report Presentations

On August 24-26, the current GGF 2035 fellows are presenting their final reports of this year’s Global Governance Futures – Robert Bosch Foundation Multilateral Dialogues program (GGF).

Register for the events here by August 23, 2021.


The Global Governance Futures program (GGF) brings together young policy professionals to look ahead to 2035 and think of ways to better address global challenges. Building on over a decade of successful rounds of the GGF program, GGF 2035 convened 27 fellows from Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Africa, and the United States. The GGF 2035 fellows – selected from the public, private and non-profit sectors – formed three working groups, each focusing on one key global issue. For this round, they examined the futures of climate-related conflict, media and information, and the politics of inequality using a tailor-made ‘scenario approach’. The strategic foresight method is a policy analysis tool that allows each of the three working groups to systematically create two — not necessarily likely, but plausible — future scenarios for their GGF 2035 topic.

The Global Governance Futures – Robert Bosch Foundation Multilateral Dialogues (GGF) program was co-designed and is generously supported by the Robert Bosch Stiftung. We rely on the continuous support of our partner institutions​ from all nine GGF countries.

Photo: FADEL SENNA / AFP (via Getty Images)

Photo: FADEL SENNA / AFP (via Getty Images)

Report Discussion: The Future of Conflict in an Age of Climate Extremes

Tuesday, August 24 at 14:00 CEST, Online via ZOOM

Climate change is not only a major environmental threat – it is also likely to have a seismic impact on human security, access to resources and (violent and non-violent) conflicts. The climate crisis will create new challenges and dramatically exacerbate existing issues: it will increase pressure on land use, lead to less available drinking water and wreck havoc in coastal areas. Where are the most likely flash points for future conflicts caused or accelerated by climate change? What are possible futures when climate-related factors raise the risk of conflict in the coming decade? What should be done to manage and/or prevent conflicts fueled by resource distribution challenges?

The GGF 2035 fellows of the Global Futures of Climate-Related Conflict Working Group have developed two very different scenarios to envision the possible futures of these complex interdependencies.

With:

  • Cheryl Chung, Co-director, Executive Education, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
  • Florian Krampe, Senior Researcher and Director, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
  • Benjamin Pohl, Head of Program Climate Diplomacy and Security, adelphi

To particpate:

Read the full report.

If you would like to attend, please register here by August 23, 2021.

Credit: Hugh Han (via Unsplash)

Credit: Hugh Han (via Unsplash)

Report Discussion: Chaos or Connection? The Global Media and Information Landscape in 2035

Wednesday, August 25 at 14:00 CEST, Online via ZOOM

The internet and the rise of social media have revolutionized how we access, consume and share information. In this final report, the GGF fellows envision futures of media and information using a collective thought experiment: What will the global media and information landscape look like in 2035? What, if any, regulations for social media platforms will be in place? Who will impose and enforce them? Who will control global data flows? How will the global state of media literacy and freedom of speech evolve? How will forces like nationalism and populism develop? What will the geopolitical balance between states look like, and how will it influence media actors and the distribution of as well as access to information?

To tackle these questions, the GGF2035 fellows in the Global Futures of Media and Information Working Group developed two scenarios for how the global media landscape could develop by 2035.

With:

  • Hong Shen, Systems Scientist, Human-Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

  • Luzhou Li, Lecturer, School of Media, Film, and Journalism, Monash University

To participate:

Read the full report.

If you would like to attend, please register here by August 23, 2021.

Photo: gustavomellossa (via Shutterstock)

Photo: gustavomellossa (via Shutterstock)

Report Discussion: A World Divided? Envisioning the Future of Global Inequality

Thursday, August 26 at 14:00 CEST, Online via ZOOM

Inequality is a multifaceted structural problem both within as well as between states. It is an underlying factor and multiplier for a myriad of other social, political and economic issues in fields like education, health care, climate change mitigation, (international) taxation, urban planning, platform regulation, and many more. While there are different dimensions of inequality, including economic inequality (income and wealth) and social inequality (access to public goods and services, discrimination in opportunities), they share a common foundation that is deeply rooted in social and political systems. What are the “politics of inequality” — meaning the interests, power relations and political processes that shape the conditions leading to greater or lesser social inequity?

The two scenarios in this report by the GGF 2035 fellows of the Global Futures of Inequality Working Group explore how the politics of inequality could potentially develop over the coming decade — in both a pleasant and unpleasant direction.

With:

  • Luanda Mpungose, Outreach and Partnership Manager, South African Institute of International Affairs
  • Njeri Mwagiru, Senior Futurist, Institute for Futures Research, University of Stellenbosch Business School

To participate:

Read the full report.

If you would like to attend, please register here by August 23, 2021.

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Please note that only registered participants will receive the dial-in details and Zoom link via email ahead of time. For any questions, please contact Joel Sandhu (jsandhu@ggpi.net).